Jan Lievens: a Dutch master rediscovered

26 October 2008 - 11 January 2009

From the museum website, 16 October 2008

Jan Lievens began his career in Leiden as a friend and rival of Rembrandt, but he soon aspired to an international career, moving to London and Antwerp before returning to Amsterdam for the last 30 years of his life. One of the most fascinating and enigmatic Dutch artists of the 17th century, Lievens was a daring and innovative painter, printmaker, and draftsman, who created a wide range of memorable works, from religious and allegorical subjects to landscapes, head studies, and formal portraits. With loans from collections in England, Europe, and America, the exhibition presents 55 paintings — several of them newly discovered — as well as about 30 prints and 50 drawings. The exhibition will provide an opportunity to reassess Lieven’s career and artistic contributions.

Support

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, national sponsor of the exhibition
Isabel and Alfred Bader
Anonymous donors in honor of George M. Kaufman
Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, indemnity

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